French-language education vs French immersion programs?

30 November 2011

Despite the fact that there are more than 425 elementary and secondary French-language Catholic and public schools in Ontario, many people ignore their existence.  Also, many confuse French-language schools managed by a French-language school board with immersion programs offered in English-language schools to students who wish to learn French as a second language.

To help you make the best decision possible, I will explain how these two concepts differ.

French-language schools are schools where everything is in French.

  • Students are taught all subjects in French, except for English, which is taught following the same standards and curriculum as in English-language schools.
  • The environment in which the student evolves is entirely Francophone: ads, posters, etc.
  • The student learns and LIVES in French.
  • The entire staff speaks French.
  • Learning and school life are enriched with activities that highlight the Francophone culture in all its diversity.

French immersion programs are offered in English-language schools to English-speaking students who want to learn French as a second language.

  • Students in French immersion programs are taught in English (with the exception of French courses and two other courses in French).
  • The school in which the immersion program is offered is an English-language school.
  • The environment in which students evolve is more Anglophone: ads, posters, etc.
  • Students learn and live mainly in English.
  • Students master English as a first language and French as a second language.

In Ontario, there are no IMMERSION SCHOOLS or BILINGUAL SCHOOLS funded by taxpayers.

In Ontario, there are four types of schools, each one belonging to one of the four types of publicly-funded school boards: French-language Catholic and public schools and English-language Catholic and public schools. “Immersion schools” do not exist. This is why the terms used should be IMMERSION PROGRAMS and FRENCH-LANGUAGE SCHOOLS.

Immersion programs allow many English-speaking individuals to develop language skills in French, which is very good and beneficial. This increases the Francophone milieu in which our students evolve by strengthening a fundamental component of the Canadian identity. However, these programs hold little weight in the effort to fight the assimilation of Francophones and cannot reverse the linguistic and cultural erosion of the Franco-Ontarian community. Indeed, it is the responsibility of French-language schools to ensure the survival and the evolution of the Francophone culture, and to encourage the development of the identity and cultural vitality of one of the two founding peoples of our country.

Marie

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DISCUSSION 34 Comments

34 Responses to : French-language education vs French immersion programs?

  1. mike says:

    Hello,

    My wife and I are trying to decide what is better for our daughter, who is approaching schooling age. should we put her in French school or French Immersion program. She is fluently bilingual, I am not. Our ultimate goal is for her to be fluently bilingual, go give her as many opportunities as possible. Do you know of any sources that could provide insight into this decision. I lean towards immersion programs – I am an educator myself I want to have an active role in my child’s education, and if she is in a French school, I am afraid I won’t be able to fulfill that role.

    Thanks for your help.

  2. marie says:

    In order to help parents such as youself make the best choice for their child’s future, we have clealy describes the distinction between French schools and immersion. FLE stands for French-language Education in Ontario. In Ontario, French schools serve more than 600 000 individuals who make up the province’s Franco-Ontarian community (http://www.elfontario.ca/en/mission.html). Hence, everything is taught in French, in a French cultural setting. These schools do not offer French immersion programs. French immersion programs are offered in English schools, by English school boards, to English-speaking students who wish to learn French as a second language.

    However, in French schools, English is taught as a subject to all students, following the same curriculum as in English schools. Students attending FLE, already immersed in an English speaking society, develop the highest level of proficiency in both of our country’s official languages (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-004-x/2008004/article/10767-eng.htm).

    FLE also provides innovative programs and services to support non-francophone parents.
    If you visit our website at this address, http://www.elfontario.ca/en/campaign.html you will discover why French-language Education in Ontario is the best choice for your child’s future.

  3. rtcm says:

    My husband and I have had this discussion over and over for the last 2 weeks, as it is that time to register our daughter for school. We are both french language right holders who both attended french language schools up to post-secondary. We chose to register our daughter in a french immersion program for 2 very big reasons. One being English is the universal language, most of the world functions and communicates in English, we wanted her to learn the English language well, yet still have a good understanding of French. Second, both my husband and I found that once we went to post-secondary all our classes were in English and we werent used to the terminology. Although we both excelled in french education, post-secondary education was a steep learning curve simply because of terminology. Had we continued in french university I’m sure we would have been fine, but in Ontario there aren’t very many universities/colleges that are offered in French. This why we chose french immersion, we want to expose our daugther to the best of both languages at the same time. Both my husband and I no longer use our french as much as we used to before post-secondary. Although it does come in handy now and then, the reality is knowing English well is more essential than knowing French well.

  4. marie says:

    Thanks for your inquiry. First let me give you some information regarding French-Language Education in Ontario. As you read on our blog, French immersion programs are offered in English-language schools to English-speaking students who want to learn French as a second language. Did you know that according to Statistics Canada: Despite increased attendance at French-language immersion programs, there is a decline in the last ten years in the ability of young Anglophones to speak French. (See graphic: http://www.elfontario.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/baisse-du-bilinguisme-francais_anglais4.jpg)

    FLE offers a range of programs and services intended for people of all age groups from daycare, to French-language schools and high schools, 2 French colleges with campuses throughout Ontario and 10 French-language and bilingual universities.
    May I suggest that you read the following post on our blog entitled “The top ten reasons to choose French-language Education in Ontario” published on January 24th 2013. In this post you will find many answers to the points you raised as far as graduation rates of our students, placement rates after graduation and statistics on bilingualism and the impressive results of our students on provincial tests (EQAO).
    There is also another post that might interest you and it’s called “I am francophone” published under International Day of La Francophonie 2012.
    Hope this can help you make the best choice for your daughter’s education!

  5. Simone says:

    Very confused by your statements. My children are enrolled in what we were told was French Immersion in Ontario. Although their first language is English, all instruction in their school is in French. As is all communications with the children. Communication to parents is in English. Where does this model fit in your analysis?

  6. Simone says:

    Should have added. All the teachers and principals first language is French.

  7. marie says:

    Can I ask you where is this school? What is the name of the school?

  8. marie says:

    I could better answer your question if you provided me with the name of the school in question (and location). Your comment is indeed puzzling. If all subjects are taught in French then your children must attend a French-language school, otherwise English schools offering any kind of French as a second language program are submitted to guidelines that do not include teaching 100% of subjects in French. In fact, it is possible for all parents in Ontario to request admission to a French-language school for their child by submitting an application to the FLE school of his or her choice. (Refer to :http://www.elfontario.ca/en/admission-criteria.html)

    English-language schools offer three streams allowing English speaking students to learn French as a second language: Core French, Extended French and French immersion programs (described on the Ontario Ministry of Education’s Web site). In each case, French is the language of instruction for a minimum percentage of the total time of instruction. (see description below, taken form the French as a Second Language curriculum document).

    In French-language schools, all subjects are taught in French with the exception of English which is taught using the same curriculum as that used in English-language schools. In French schools, teaching, learning and all other activities take place in a French cultural setting.

    Perhaps by sharing more information we will determine which school system your children’s school belongs to.

    French Immersion Programs
    In a French Immersion program, French must be the language of instruction for a minimum of 50 per cent of the total instructional time at every grade level of the program. Immersion programs must include the study of French as a second language and the study of at least two other subjects taught in French. These two subjects must be selected from the following: the arts, social studies (Grades 1 to 6) or history and geography (Grades 7 and 8), mathematics, science and technology, and health and physical education. Immersion programs must provide a minimum of 3800 hours of instruction in French by the end of Grade 8.
    It has been shown that a student’s level of proficiency in French increases with the number of accumulated hours of instruction in French. Many French Immersion programs thus exceed the minimum requirement of 3800 hours of French instructional time. An immersion program starting in Grade 1 generally provides instruction in French in all subjects (i.e., for 100 per cent of total instructional time) until Grade 3 or 4, when students begin to study English language arts.3 Instruction in English may then be gradually extended to include other subjects. By the end of Grade 8, students may receive up to 50 per cent of their instruction in English.

    Extended French Programs
    In an Extended French program, French must be the language of instruction for a minimum of 25 per cent of the total instructional time at every grade level of the program. Extended French programs must include the study of French as a second language and the study of at least one other subject taught in French. That subject must be selected from the following: the arts, social studies (Grades 1 to 6) or history and geography (Grades 7 and 8), mathematics,
    2. Students who have completed a French Immersion program in elementary school may proceed to either an Extended French or a French Immersion program at the secondary level. Where only a Core French program is offered in sec- ondary schools, students who have studied French in extended or immersion programs at the elementary level should be considered for advanced placement in the Core French program.
    3. Students who start their study of English in Grade 3 or 4 will be expected to achieve the curriculum expectations outlined in The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1–8: Language, 1997 between Grade 3 or 4 and Grade 8.

    THE ONTARIO CURRICULUM: FSL — EXTENDED FRENCH, GRADES 4–8; FRENCH IMMERSION, GRADES 1–8, 2001science and technology, and health and physical education. Extended French programs must provide a minimum of 1260 hours of instruction in French by the end of Grade 8.
    The expectations outlined in this document are designed for a five-year program, starting in Grade 4, that meets the provincial requirements of a minimum of 1260 hours of instructional time in French by Grade 8 and a minimum of 25 per cent of instructional time in French at each grade level.

  9. stephanie says:

    Hello! I am interested in this debate. My Husband is French, I am English… we speak English at home. We had plans to move to France and put our son in a local French school, but, as luck would have it, our plans have changed and we will stay in Canada.

    Our Son is 11 in October and speaks English, he is relatively familiar with French, but by no means (at all) fluent!

    We tried to put our son in to our French language school a few years ago, grade 4 (he is now Grade 6) and the French school, in no uncertain terms told us…they could not take him… since he doesn’t speak French…. (question about teachers and teaching….hmmmmm) anyway we have since, no thanks to the FLE, found out that it is our right, based on my husband’s native tongue, and that we are Canadian Citizens, that our son , can be taught in French!

    If we had moved to France… we would have enrolled him in the local French school. However given the FLE’s reluctance to enroll English speaking students, i am beginning to wonder if they are best placed to ‘teach’ him? any thoughts?

  10. marie says:

    Admission to French-language schools can be granted in one of two ways:

    Under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a child is eligible, without any other condition, if the parent is a Canadian citizen and meets one or all of the following criteria:
    The first language learned and still understood is French;
    He or she was educated, at the elementary level, in French in Canada;
    He or she is the parent or tutor of a child who has received or who is receiving his or her education at the elementary or secondary level in French in Canada.
    If the school refuses admission to your son, you should consider dealing directly with the school board. There are also programs in FLE school to help your son with his French.

  11. Mat says:

    Hi Marie,

    My EX and I split when my son was just a few months old and at the time she wouldn’t agree to anything other then French immersion which, at the time, I assumed would be a fair compromise. I still knew I wanted my son to get FLE but figured I had a few years to convince her.

    Sadly time has gone by but things haven’t changed and I have recently visited the French immersion school where she signed him up without so much as discussing it with me. To make matters worse, the principle did nothing but turn me off from the whole ideal. When I asked her how the immersion program worked she couldn’t tell me much other than they speak English one day and French the next and learned the subjects as you described in a previous post. I was although shocked to hear her tell me that they do not have French class as they simply learn it as they learn the other subjects and by speaking it 50% of the time. I then told her that I didn’t understand how they learned French without a formal French class and she simply answered “Well that’s why they are teachers and you aren’t!” Needless to say, that after being treated with such disrespect, arrogance and after not having even heard a single word of French over my 30 minutes visit at the school, I came to the conclusion that French immersion wasn’t for my son.

    He’s four years old and has only been exposed to French with me every other weekend. We watch movies, cartoons, read books and listen to music in French but he still doesn’t speak a word of it.

    I’ve seen the link to the Top 10 reasons to attend FLE but am now looking for any and all other possible ammunition to convince a judge that this is what’s best for my son. I’ve also been told like some of the people in that particular thread that it’s almost impossible for a child to make the jump from an immersion program to FLE. Doing so even if allowed could be setting your child up for failure because of the obvious gap between the immersion programs and an actual French school.

    Could you please point me to any other possible material that isn’t touched on in the other post that could help solidify my case. I understand you aren’t a lawyer and what I’ve seen so far on here is amazing but I’m now sadly left with the task of convincing a judge of all this and an English mom who attended a french immersion program in high school but still tries to come up with a million excuses as to why this isn’t what’s best for our child “read, spite me”

    Thanks a million

    Mathieu

  12. Mimi says:

    Hi,
    I stumbled on your article while doing research on this subject and I realize that this is over a year old but I hope you will be able to respond to me.

    I am a new immigrant and I am looking to enroll my twin daughters in either French immersion or French language school. I am relatively fluent in French and have already spoken with the principal of the French language school who is happy to accept the girls at her school.

    My daughters used to speak French when they were younger but have since forgotten since we migrated here as they were attending English daycare.
    My husband and I speak to them at home in our native tongue.

    So my one concern is, if I do enroll them in the French language, as opposed to the French immersion, how good will their English skills be, seeing as they will not be speaking English at home?

    As a previous commenter put it, I think it is very important that they are very good in English. But I would like to make them as good in French. I know that if they attend the French language school, French will be a mother tongue. So given that we are in Ontario where everything outside of their school is in English, would English be a mother tongue to them too?

    Any comments are very welcome. Thank you.

  13. marie says:

    I would recommend that you read my blog of April 18th (http://www.elfontario.ca/blog/en/education-en-langue-francaise-en-ontario/difference-entre-lelf-et-les-programmes-dimmersions/) on the difference between a FRENCH-LANGUAGE SCHOOL and a French immersion PROGRAM inan ENGLISH school. Graduates of FLE are completely bilingual, can pursue post secondary studies in French colleges and bilingaul universities.

    In French-language schools, all subjects are taught in French with the exception of English which is taught using the same curriculum as that used in English-language schools. In French schools, teaching, learning and all other activities take place in a French cultural setting.

    Did you know that according to Statistics Canada: Despite increased attendance at French-language immersion programs, there is a decline in the last ten years in the ability of young Anglophones to speak French. (See graphic: http://www.elfontario.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/baisse-du-bilinguisme-francais_anglais4.jpg)
    Students attending FLE, already immersed in an English speaking society, develop the highest level of proficiency in both of our country’s official languages (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-004-x/2008004/article/10767-eng.htm).
    FLE offers a range of programs and services intended for people of all age groups from daycare, to French-language schools and high schools, 2 French colleges with campuses throughout Ontario and 10 French-language and bilingual universities.
    May I suggest that you read the following post on our blog entitled “The top ten reasons to choose French-language Education in Ontario” published on January 24th 2013. In this post you will find many answers to the points you raised as far as graduation rates of our students, placement rates after graduation and statistics on bilingualism and the impressive results of our students on provincial tests (EQAO).
    There is also another post that might interest you and it’s called “I am francophone” published under International Day of La Francophonie 2012.
    Hope this can help you make the best choice for your child’s education!

  14. marie says:

    I would recommend that you read my blog of April 18th (http://www.elfontario.ca/blog/en/education-en-langue-francaise-en-ontario/difference-entre-lelf-et-les-programmes-dimmersions/) on the difference between a FRENCH-LANGUAGE SCHOOL and a French immersion PROGRAM inan ENGLISH school. Graduates of FLE are completely bilingual, can pursue post secondary studies in French colleges and bilingaul universities.

    In French-language schools, all subjects are taught in French with the exception of English which is taught using the same curriculum as that used in English-language schools. In French schools, teaching, learning and all other activities take place in a French cultural setting.

    Did you know that according to Statistics Canada: Despite increased attendance at French-language immersion programs, there is a decline in the last ten years in the ability of young Anglophones to speak French. (See graphic: http://www.elfontario.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/baisse-du-bilinguisme-francais_anglais4.jpg)

    Students attending FLE, already immersed in an English speaking society, develop the highest level of proficiency in both of our country’s official languages (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/81-004-x/2008004/article/10767-eng.htm).

    FLE offers a range of programs and services intended for people of all age groups from daycare, to French-language schools and high schools, 2 French colleges with campuses throughout Ontario and 10 French-language and bilingual universities.

  15. lindsay says:

    Bonjour Marie,

    Nous (mon mari et moi) sommes en train de prendre décision sur l’éducation de notre petite fille de 4 ans. Elle ne parle que l’anglais (sa grand-mère n’est pas bilingue), mais on essaye toujours de se familiariser avec le français.

    Mes questions sont : comment est-ce qu’on peut s’assurer que notre petite réussira dans un milieu scolaire complètement francophone, même si sa gardienne ne parle pas français? Est-ce que ce sera mieux de l’enregistrer dans une école qui offre des cours d’immersion (c.à.d une école anglophone)? Est-ce que la culture française sera trop différente pour une petite fille qui, jusqu’au moment, s’était elèvé dans un milieu presque complètement anglophone?

    Nous reconnaissons que l’anglais s’attrape facilement; le français est beaucoup plus difficile à apprendre (et de retenir! ;) )

    (Je suis assez bilingue, née à Montréal. Je travaille dans un milieu *très* bilingue. Mon mari vient de Toronto, mais il avait assisté le secondaire dans un programme d’immersion).

    Je vous merci à l’avance pour vos conseils.

  16. Marie says:

    Cher parent,

    Les écoles de langue française accueillent plusieurs jeunes enfants (et moins jeunes) en provenance de familles qui ne parlent pas ou qui parlent peu le français. Aussi, compte tenu que l’Ontario reçoit des immigrants de tous les pays du monde, les écoles de langue française desservent des enfants dont la langue maternelle des parents n’est ni le français, ni l’anglais. De fait, la Loi sur l’éducation de l’Ontario et les conseils scolaires de langue française à travers la province ont prévu des mécanismes pour faciliter l’admission aux écoles de langue française (http://www.elfontario.ca/fr/criteres.html) d’enfants désireux de profiter des nombreux avantages qu’offrent l’ELF (http://www.elfontario.ca/fr/campagne.html).

    Compte tenu de la diversité de leur clientèle, les écoles de langue française offrent des programmes et des services justement conçus pour assurer le succès des élèves qui parlent peu ou pas le français au moment de leur entrée dans l’école. Nous vous invitons à parcourir cette page du site http://www.elfontario.ca/fr/programmes-services.html pour vous familiariser avec les programmes et services en question, notamment les suivants: le Programme d’actualisation de la langue française (ALF), le Programme d’appui aux nouveaux arrivants (PANA) et le service d’appui aux devoirs.

    N’hésitez pas à communiquer avec le conseil scolaire ou l’école de votre choix pour obtenir plus de renseignements puisque chaque école et conseil offrent aussi des programmes et des services d’appui aux parents. Vous pouvez communiquer avec l’un ou l’autre en vous servant du lien suivant: http://www.elfontario.ca/fr/elementaires.php

    J’espère que cette réponse vous soit utile dans votre prise de décision,

    Cordialement,
    Marie

  17. Lara says:

    Hi Marie,

    My 2 daughters are currently in grade 1 and grade 3 french immersion. My husband went to french school until grade 11. We speak english at home. I was thinking of transferring my girls to a FLE school. Is it too late? What should I consider before making a transfer?

    Thanks. :)

  18. djoudjou says:

    Bonjour Marie
    je voudrai savoir quelle est la meilleures écoles pour mon fils qui a 4 ans. à la maison et avec lui je parle une autre langue autre que le français et l’anglais. je sais que mon fils pourra apprendre facilement ces deux langues.
    admettant que mon fils rentrera dans une école francophone , j’immagine qu’il apprendra convenablement le français à l’école pendant qu’il apprendra l’anglais à extérieurs . “je voudrai savoir est ce qu’il pourra dans ce cas poursuivre ses études à l’université en anglais et est ce qu’il sera aussi fort en écris en français qu’on anglais sachant qu’il fréquentera seulement des écoles française dans son jeune age ”

    j’ai un autre soucis aussi , en ce moment la seule école francophone public que j’ai trouvé dans le quartier où j’habite n’est pas vraiment conseillé (Charlotte le mieux). les autres écoles sont catholique (apparemment j’ai pas le droit de faire rentrer mon fils parce que je n’ai pas de certificat de baptême …..).
    je ne sais pas est ce que je peux faire rentrer mon fils dans cette école francophone (charlotte le mieux ) malgré qu’on me la déconseillé, ensuite je vais essayer de lui changer d’école à 5 ans en déménageant ailleurs, ou bien je vais le faire rentrer directement dans une autre école immersion française (Woodroof) en attendant .

  19. ELF says:

    Bonjour,

    Vous recevrez sous peu à votre adresse courriel une réponse.

    Merci et bonne journée!

  20. KK says:

    Hello,
    I am curious to know what standards of language expectation is in french immersion vs. full french schools in Ontario. Does french immersion also follow the GB+ reading levels? If so, are the student in both types of school’s expected to be graduating from grade to grade with the same competency?
    Thanks for any clarifications you may have!

  21. ELF says:

    We thank you for your question.
    As you might already know, French language education is quite different from French Immersion programs since French language schools are educational establishments where students live and learn in French in a francophone environment. They are managed by one of the 12 French-­language school boards in Ontario. All subjects are taught in French except for English, which is taught following the same curriculum as in English ­language schools. As for French immersion programs are offered by English-­language school boards within English-­language schools. Immersion programs teach French as a second language. The GB + reading level is a system proposed by a private company. It is used only by the French language schools who choose to do so, but more often as a teaching and reference tool. The competency levels are different than those of the French Immersion programs and are not used as formal evaluation tools to graduate a student. We also invite you to consult our April 18, 1213 blog on the “Difference between FLE schools & French Immersion Programs”.

  22. Ame says:

    Hello Marie
    I’m an immigrant parent of 2 boys, going to private french schools in Quebec in sec 2 and grade 5. It’s been 2 years and I’m not happy with the system here. My boys find it easier to communicate in English ( though they went to french schools in our country of origin) yet their writing skills are not good at all. It looks like the french level in Quebec is higher and from what I’m reading here, I’m wondering if French schools in a Ontario have an “easier/ more accommodating “program ?
    How can I compare the level of difficulty? And I’m also wondering since they would do university in English, anyways, would it be better to switch to french immersion ?
    I’m looking to place them in a system where they perform well .The french system here seems to be frustrating specially for my oldest .No matter how much he works it’s not reflected on his marks and he is losing his self esteem. what kind of evaluation can be conducted to assess which system is better for him ?
    Thank you for advising, much appreciated .

  23. incroyable article, merci bien.

  24. VC says:

    Is it possible for someone who does not hold section 23 rights to send their child to French Catholic school?

  25. ELF says:

    Thank you for your comment,

    We sincerely understand your preoccupation and the fact that you wish your sons to succeed in their education. The French level in Ontario’s French language schools is of high quality but also respects its population profile which includes a growing number of newcomers and families with parents that are not necessarily fluent in French. Thus special programs and resources are in place to optimize the learning of each pupil, particularly newcomers whose mother tongue is not necessarily French.

    French immersion programs are quite different from the French language system. French immersion programs are offered in English-language schools to English-speaking students who want to learn French as a second language. Since these are two different systems there is unfortunately no mechanism in place to assess which system would be better for your children. However, since most French schools have means of evaluating the level of French when admitting new students, we suggest that you contact the French school nearest to you to enquire on their services : http://www.elfontario.ca/en/elementary-schools.php or the school board itself.

    We also believe that sending your sons to a French language school is an excellent choice. Research tend to prove that French schools provide long-term fluency in both official languages (Statistics Canada “Youth Bilingualism in Canada”). Also, Ontario’s provincial test results show that students in the French schools perform remarkably well and that it offers them excellent opportunities for their future.

    Regarding your concern towards post-secondary education, they can definitely pursue their studies in English since English classes are taught according to the same curriculum as in English­ speaking schools. Students who receive a high­school diploma from a French­ language school are proficient in both Canada’s official languages. This increases their chances of being admitted to the post­secondary education or training program of their choice, as they can apply to French­language, English language or bilingual postsecondary institutions. http://www.elfontario.ca/en/find-postsecondary-program.php?

    Hoping this answer will be of help.

  26. ELF says:

    Individuals who do not meet the criteria stated in section 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms may still submit an application for admission to a French-language school. The application is reviewed by the admission committee at the local school board. The population in Ontario is constantly changing, both demographically and culturally. For this reason, new guidelines were established for the French-language school boards. Since January 2010, the school boards have adopted a more consistent internal policy regarding the admission of children whose parents do not have rights holder status. To find a French Catholic school nearest you, please consult the search engine of the French language education Web site : http://www.elfontario.ca/en/elementary-schools.php

    We thank you for your comment.

  27. Leanie says:

    This is the very question we are struggling with as our child starts kindergarten in the fall. We live right beside an English school with a French immersion program, but when we visited I had concerns about the quality of the French being spoken and written. Grammar and conjugation errors were everywhere! And English syntax was being used. The teachers themselves are not francophones so my question is about the quality of their French. What qualifies someone to be a French immersion teacher? If only our local French school were a little more “local” and not a bus ride away…

  28. Fawaz says:

    Hi,
    I have two kids just finished grade 2 and grade 7 in Montreal, we are moving to Mississauga this summer ,my kids has been in French schools for almost three years, I don’t to which schools I should send them Francophone or French Immersion school, I would like them to keep the French beside English ,please advice what is best for them where to go and how to register them in either one .
    Thanks.
    Faz

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  30. hiba krey says:

    hello, we are from Lebanon (its an Arabic& francophone country) we are in process of immigration to Canada, we will be moving to canada by october or november 2015 so my concern is for my six year old boy, he is french educated (we start school at 3 years here) he is fluent in french, my husband and i, are french educated also (schools and universities) and of course we learned english at schools as a third language besides arabic and french, so our question is can my son attend a French-language school in Toronto? are we eligible to enroll him? and can he learn also english in the french language school as a second language? hope for a reply thank you.

  31. ELF says:

    As a new comer to Ontario/Canada and knowledgeable of the French Language your son is entitled to attend a French-Language school. It will be an excellent choice for your son: not only will he continue his education in a French environment but he will also learn a high level of English since the English courses are taught starting in elementary school, with the same curriculum as in English-speaking schools.

    To enroll your child in a French-language school, contact the French-language school or the French-language school board of your choice or the one closest to you. You can use the French-language schools search tool available on the French-language education in Ontario website. http://www.elfontario.ca/. General information in both French and English is also available on this Web site or on the Ontario Ministry of Education Web site. : http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/amenagement/
    Bienvenue à l’école de langue française en Ontario!

  32. ELF says:

    If your children have been attending French schools for the past years and you wish them to keep their knowledge of the French-language, the choice of a Francophone school is your best option. It will be an excellent choice for your children: not only will they be guaranteed a solid education in French but he will also maintain a high level of English since the English courses are taught starting in elementary school, with the same curriculum as in English-speaking schools. They should therefore be fluently bilingual.

    To enroll your child in a French-language (Francophone) school, contact the French-language school or the French-language school board of your choice or the one closest to you. You can use the French-language schools search tool available on the French-language education in Ontario website. http://www.elfontario.ca/. General information in both French and English is also available on this Web site or on the Ontario Ministry of Education Web site. : http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/amenagement/
    Hoping this answer will be helpful!

  33. Berbetwa says:

    Hi, my son is joining school next year. I wish to apply in a French school but does the government help parents learning French as a second language to be able to apply for my kid. I already have French basics from school but yet no practice

  34. ELF says:

    To enroll your child in a French-language school, we recommend that you contact the French-language school or the French-language school board of your choice or the one closest to you, and explain your situation. All French schools and school boards have bilingual staff that can assist you in the process.
    To find a school you can use the French-language schools search tool available on the French-language education in Ontario website. http://www.elfontario.ca/. General information in both French and English is available on this Web site or on the Ontario Ministry of Education Web site. : http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/amenagement/
    Please note that even though you may not be an official “right older” in order to send your child to a French-language school, you may still apply. French-language school boards have reviewed their admission policy, which serves as a guide to the admissions committees in order to be more inclusive and reflect the growing diversity of the province.
    Hoping this answer is helpful

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